wildcat2030:

Freaky 3-D Scanning Turns Human Skin Into Art
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The most startling thing about the music video for British band Duologue’s song Memex isn’t the ghostly way the slow-panning camera turns human skin into a landscape. It’s not how the model, actor Beryl Nesbitt, manages not to blink. And it’s not how at 3:30 in, with just a change in the lighting, the tone of the video abruptly gets dark and sinister. Rather, the most startling thing about the Memex video is that none of those hyper-realistic shots are photos. It’s a virtual 3-D scan of a human body, in this case, British actor Beryl Nesbitt. The knowledge that it’s virtual reality makes watching the video a little like seeing a Chuck Close for the first time: Your eyes initially registered a black-and-white photograph of monolithic scale, and it takes a few beats before you can believe that it’s a painting. London-based creative studio Marshmallow Laser Feast—great name!—made the video for the band (and their friends) Duologue as an deep dive experiment into filmmaking for virtual reality. Hollywood has been using various kinds of 3-D scanning technology for years—films like Avatar, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, relied on it. But for the Memex video, the creators used 94 cameras, whereas some Hollywood studios have been reported to use seven, to capture Nesbitt’s glowing skin in the most microscopic detail possible. (via Freaky 3-D Scanning Turns Human Skin Into Art | WIRED)

— 3 days ago with 65 notes

No Humans needed- Bots - talking amongst themselves - A twitter conversation between two bots (@oliviataters and @notkeithcalder) was picked up and intercepted by the Bank of America bot account. 

(Source: algopop)

— 1 month ago with 5800 notes
It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
- Charles Darwin

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

- Charles Darwin

(Source: startupquote)

— 3 months ago with 728 notes
If the future of food is designed by robots, that’s fine by me.
IBM sent me a bottle of BBQ sauce designed by Watson, so I ate it. My job is weird sometimes.
Yes, it’s THE Watson. The same computer that decimated Ken Jennings in Jeopardy has taken on an even greater challenge—what IBM calls cognitive computing, or put more simply, creativity. And what better arena to test creativity than the kitchen? After all, computers are good at math or whatever, but they can’t invent the next cronut or conceptualize the snack chip that will become a taco shell. They can’t stick a toilet plunger in a melted pile of brown birthday fondant like those bakers on reality TV—right?
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If the future of food is designed by robots, that’s fine by me.

IBM sent me a bottle of BBQ sauce designed by Watson, so I ate it. My job is weird sometimes.

Yes, it’s THE Watson. The same computer that decimated Ken Jennings in Jeopardy has taken on an even greater challenge—what IBM calls cognitive computing, or put more simply, creativity. And what better arena to test creativity than the kitchen? After all, computers are good at math or whatever, but they can’t invent the next cronut or conceptualize the snack chip that will become a taco shell. They can’t stick a toilet plunger in a melted pile of brown birthday fondant like those bakers on reality TV—right?

Read More>

(via fastcodesign)

— 3 months ago with 49 notes

App Turns NYC Subway Maps Into Interactive Data Visualizations

If you’re a New Yorker who likes to nerd out about maps, urbanism, and data visualization, a new app called Tunnel Vision will be like poetry to your eyes. But even if you’re not into any of those things, it might make dismal waits on subway platforms a little more fun.

Read More>

(via fastcodesign)

— 3 months ago with 2441 notes
An Iranian teacher has come up with an innovative way of encouraging young children to say their daily prayers – by designing a robot to present religious practice to his students in the classroom. (via Iranian school teacher builds robot to teach children prayers)

An Iranian teacher has come up with an innovative way of encouraging young children to say their daily prayers – by designing a robot to present religious practice to his students in the classroom. (via Iranian school teacher builds robot to teach children prayers)

— 6 months ago
What Tree Rings Sound Like Played on a Record Player →

(Source: heathershawdesign)

— 6 months ago with 1 note

Norway’s Moving Terrorism Memorial Will Be A Gash In The Landscape

"The memorial aims to recreate the physical experience of something being taken away."

(via fastcodesign)

— 6 months ago with 91 notes